‘Allen v. Farrow’ Episode 4 Recap: An Adult Dylan Farrow Speaks Out

The finale of the HBO docuseries delves into the changing perception of Woody Allen and Ms. Farrow’s decision to go public with her allegations of sexual abuse.The final installment of “Allen v. Farrow,” an HBO documentary series examining Dylan Farrow’s sexual abuse allegations against her adopted father, Woody Allen, covers the years from 1993, when a state’s attorney declined to prosecute the filmmaker, to the present.The previous three episodes explored what Ms. Farrow says happened on Aug. 4, 1992, when she was 7 years old — that her father sexually assaulted her in the attic of the family’s Connecticut country home. The filmmakers combed through police and court documents, scrutinized the integrity of the investigations into her accusation and sought expert analysis of video footage of young Dylan telling her mother what happened.Mr. Allen has long denied sexually abusing his daughter and has accused her mother, Mia Farrow — Mr. Allen’s ex-girlfriend — of concocting the sexual-assault accusation because she was angry at him for having a sexual relationship with her college-age daughter, Soon-Yi Previn. (Mr. Allen and Ms. Previn later married.) A spokesperson for Mr. Allen, who did not participate in the documentary, said that it is “riddled with falsehoods.”The finale covers the world’s reaction to the events of the early 1990s, Mr. Allen’s continued fame and accolades and, in recent years, a growing unwillingness among those in Hollywood to be associated with him after the #MeToo Movement.The prosecutor’s decisionThe episode begins on Sept. 24, 1993. That day, Frank Maco, a Connecticut state’s attorney, announced that although he had “probable cause” to prosecute Mr. Allen, he had decided he would not press charges to spare Ms. Farrow the potential trauma of a trial.Mr. Maco, who was interviewed extensively for the documentary, says that earlier that month in 1993, he had met with young Dylan in his office, with toys in the room and a female state trooper there. When Mr. Maco asked about her father, he said, she froze up and would not respond.“The strongest proponents for prosecution just looked at me, and we all shrugged our shoulders,” Mr. Maco said. “We weren’t going anywhere with this child.”In a news conference, Mr. Allen said that rather that being happy or grateful for the decision, he said he was “merely disgusted” that his children had been “made to suffer unbearably by the unwholesome alliance between a vindictive mother and a cowardly, dishonest, irresponsible state’s attorney and his police.”“I felt if I had just kept his secret,” Ms. Farrow says, “I could have spared my mom all this grief, and my brothers and sister — myself.”HBODylan grows upIn the years after the police investigation and the custody trial, which ended in her mother’s favor, Ms. Farrow says she suffered through a long period of guilt, thinking that she was at fault for the family rift.“I felt if I had just kept his secret,” she tells the filmmakers, “I could have spared my mom all this grief, and my brothers and sister — myself.”Siblings say in the series that Ms. Farrow often kept to herself and seemed riddled with anxiety. She says that she didn’t talk about the assault in depth with anyone — not even her mother or her therapist. In high school, she recalls, she broke up with her only boyfriend after only three weeks because she anticipated that he would want to be intimate with her.Ronan Farrow, Ms. Farrow’s brother, tells the filmmakers that his mother tried to distance her children from Mr. Allen. But, he says, “there was always a lot of incentive to be drawn into Woody Allen’s efforts to discredit” his sister. For example, Mr. Farrow says, Mr. Allen had made him an offer that if he spoke out against his mother and his sister publicly, Mr. Allen would help pay for his college education.After an awards showThe saga returned to the public discourse in 2014, after Mr. Allen received a lifetime achievement award at the Golden Globes. In the past, Mr. Farrow tells filmmakers, he had discouraged his sister from speaking publicly about their father and the events of the 1990s with the hope that the family could put it behind them.But after the awards show, Mr. Farrow tweeted, “Missed the Woody Allen tribute — did they put the part where a woman publicly confirmed he molested her at age 7 before or after Annie Hall?” Ms. Farrow says that her brother’s willingness to speak publicly about the subject emboldened her to write about her memory of events, which appeared in The New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof’s blog. (Mr. Farrow, who helped his sister publish the open letter, said that after another newspaper declined to print the account, he took it to Mr. Kristof, a family friend.) Mr. Allen later published an Op-Ed in The Times denying his daughter’s allegations.For two decades, Ms. Farrow says, she felt isolated and alone because of her experience. After publishing her letter, she received an outpouring of messages from people she knew sharing their own experiences with sexual abuse.Loyalty to Mr. AllenStill, many Hollywood actors remained loyal to Mr. Allen despite the accusations, and his star power and industry reputation remained mostly intact..css-1xzcza9{list-style-type:disc;padding-inline-start:1em;}.css-rqynmc{font-family:nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif;font-size:0.9375rem;line-height:1.25rem;color:#333;margin-bottom:0.78125rem;}@media (min-width:740px){.css-rqynmc{font-size:1.0625rem;line-height:1.5rem;margin-bottom:0.9375rem;}}.css-rqynmc strong{font-weight:600;}.css-rqynmc em{font-style:italic;}.css-yoay6m{margin:0 auto 5px;font-family:nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif;font-weight:700;font-size:1.125rem;line-height:1.3125rem;color:#121212;}@media (min-width:740px){.css-yoay6m{font-size:1.25rem;line-height:1.4375rem;}}.css-1dg6kl4{margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;}#masthead-bar-one{display:none;}#masthead-bar-one{display:none;}.css-1pd7fgo{background-color:white;border:1px solid #e2e2e2;width:calc(100% – 40px);max-width:600px;margin:1.5rem auto 1.9rem;padding:15px;box-sizing:border-box;}@media (min-width:740px){.css-1pd7fgo{padding:20px;width:100%;}}.css-1pd7fgo:focus{outline:1px solid #e2e2e2;}#NYT_BELOW_MAIN_CONTENT_REGION .css-1pd7fgo{border:none;padding:20px 0 0;border-top:1px solid #121212;}.css-1pd7fgo[data-truncated] .css-rdoyk0{-webkit-transform:rotate(0deg);-ms-transform:rotate(0deg);transform:rotate(0deg);}.css-1pd7fgo[data-truncated] .css-eb027h{max-height:300px;overflow:hidden;-webkit-transition:none;transition:none;}.css-1pd7fgo[data-truncated] .css-5gimkt:after{content:’See more’;}.css-1pd7fgo[data-truncated] .css-6mllg9{opacity:1;}.css-coqf44{margin:0 auto;overflow:hidden;}.css-coqf44 strong{font-weight:700;}.css-coqf44 em{font-style:italic;}.css-coqf44 a{color:#326891;-webkit-text-decoration:underline;text-decoration:underline;text-underline-offset:1px;-webkit-text-decoration-thickness:1px;text-decoration-thickness:1px;-webkit-text-decoration-color:#ccd9e3;text-decoration-color:#ccd9e3;}.css-coqf44 a:visited{color:#333;-webkit-text-decoration-color:#333;text-decoration-color:#333;}.css-coqf44 a:hover{-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}Four days after Ms. Farrow’s letter was published, her brother Moses Farrow told People Magazine that she was never molested. He also said that Mia Farrow coached the children to hate Mr. Allen and that she often hit him as a child. When Dylan Farrow learned what her brother said, she burst into tears, saying, “It was like I had been told that this person that I knew and loved and trusted was gone.”In interviews with the filmmakers, Ronan Farrow along with two more siblings, Fletcher Previn and Daisy Previn, say that the abuse allegations against their mother were untrue.In 2018, Moses Farrow followed up with a blog post that continued to dispute his sister’s account of sexual abuse. He targeted a specific detail of her story, which she had included in The Times letter: that while Mr. Allen sexually assaulted her, she remembers focusing on her brother’s electric train set, which had been traveling in circles around the attic. Mr. Farrow said that there was no electric train set in the attic. In Mr. Allen’s recent memoir, “Apropos of Nothing,” he also disputed that detail, calling it a “fresh creative touch.”But, according to police documents, the detectives investigating the alleged assault did find a train set in the attic. A detailed drawing from 1992, which is shown in the episode, includes an object labeled “toy train track” in the attic crawl space.Ms. Farrow with her mother, Mia Farrow.HBODylan, decades laterThis episode captures Ms. Farrow’s adult life, 28 years after she says her father assaulted her. It shows her husband, Sean, whom she met on a dating site linked to The Onion, and Ms. Farrow, now 35, playing with their young daughter.At one point, Mia Farrow asks her daughter, “Do you ever feel angry at me?” referring to her choice to bring Mr. Allen into the family. In response, Dylan Farrow says that, first and foremost, she was glad that her mother believed her account of that day in 1992, saying, “You were there when it mattered.”Another scene in the episode shows Mr. Maco, the state’s attorney, meeting with Ms. Farrow — their first encounter since 1993.Mr. Maco said that he told Mia Farrow that when her daughter becomes an adult, he would be happy to answer any questions. That opportunity came last fall — and the documentary team recorded their conversation.“A part of me really, really wishes that I could have done it,” Dylan Farrow tells Mr. Maco, “that I could have had my day in court.”

Not Enough Vaccine Doses In Europe To Stop A 3rd Wave, German Health Minister Says

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“There are not yet enough vaccine doses in Europe to stop the third wave by vaccination alone,” German Health Minister Jens Spahn said Friday. Here, a health care worker displays a vial of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine in Stuttgart, Germany.

Marijan Murat/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Marijan Murat/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

German Health Minister Jens Spahn is telling Germans to diligently follow coronavirus safety rules, warning that vaccines won’t arrive quickly enough to prevent a third wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. New infections in Germany are rising at a “very clearly exponential rate,” Spahn said. “There are not yet enough vaccine doses in Europe to stop the third wave by vaccination alone,” Spahn said at a news conference Friday, according to a translation by Deutsche Welle. “Even if the deliveries from EU orders come reliably, it will still take a few weeks until the risk groups are fully vaccinated.” Germany’s infection rate is rising at a pace not seen since the record spike it endured in December and January. The numbers fell sharply in February, but they’re now curving upward again as Germany enters a third wave of the pandemic, propelled by new variants and infections among people younger than 65. With Germany set for a four-day-weekend in early April due to the Easter holiday, Spahn said the country isn’t ready to relax travel and physical distancing rules. In fact, he said, Germans should be prepared to revert to tighter restrictions.

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A chart from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control shows the 14-day trends in Germany for new coronavirus cases (in red) and deaths (in blue).

European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control

European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control

Overall, the country has reported 2,639,258 total coronavirus cases and 74,405 deaths.

“Health experts are calling on the German government to order a third lockdown to prevent hospitals from being overrun,” NPR’s Rob Schmitz reports from Berlin. German Chancellor Angela Merkel is set to meet with the governors of Germany’s 16 states on Monday, when they will discuss whether to reinstate lockdown conditions. Germany and other European countries resumed administering the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine on Friday after the European Medicines Agency reiterated that the vaccine is “safe and effective” in fighting the coronavirus. As it tries to boost its vaccine campaign, Germany is also moving ahead with talks to acquire Russia’s Sputnik V vaccine — with or without the rest of the EU’s involvement. Spahn said Friday that he believes a deal with Russia could be reached quickly once a delivery amount is agreed upon. “I am actually very much in favor of us doing it nationally if the European Union does not do something,” he added, according to Deutsche Welle. Across the EU, member nations have reported 24,175,984 confirmed coronavirus cases and 577,310 deaths, according to the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control.

Google doubles down on office space despite the rise in remote work

On Thursday, Google (GOOG) said it plans to invest more than $7 billion in offices and data centers in the United States and create at least 10,000 additional full-time jobs this year. “Coming together in person to collaborate and build community is core to Google’s culture, and it will be an important part of our future,” CEO Sundar Pichai said in a blog post. “So we continue to make significant investments in our offices around the country.”Google said it will invest more than $1 billion this year in its home state of California. The company also plans to expand its other offices, including adding thousands of roles in Atlanta, Washington, DC, Chicago and New York.Google plans to invest $250 million in New York City this year and will grow its headcount in the city to 14,000 over the next few years, up from 11,000 currently, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Thursday.Silicon Valley’s biggest companies were among the first businesses to tell their employees to work remotely as the coronavirus began spreading in the United States. Now, some of these companies are among the most aggressive in expanding their office footprint.Last year, Facebook said it would buy a previously unused corporate headquarters from outdoor retailer REI, even though it plans to shift more of its employees to working from home in the coming years. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has said that he could see half of Facebook’s employees permanently working remotely within the next five to 10 years.Amazon announced plans to hire 3,500 more workers in various US cities last fall. It said it will expand offices in New York, Dallas, Detroit, Denver, Phoenix and San Diego, resulting in more than 905,000 square feet of additional office space.Many tech companies have thrived during the pandemic and are adding thousands of workers at a time when other companies are undergoing layoffs or even shutting down. These tech giants can also afford to be more opportunistic in picking up commercial real estate regardless of whether they have longer-term plans for transitioning to more remote work in the future. Unlike some startups and smaller tech firms that have promised permanent remote work options, Big Tech has spent billions on elaborate offices over the years and may be more reluctant to abandon in-person work after the pandemic ends.CNN’s Kristina Sgueglia contributed reporting

China is raising the alarm over corporate surveillance. But it's got a massive network of its own

The firestorm first erupted Monday during a two-hour primetime program called “315” that coincides with World Consumer Rights Day. The program is frequently used by China’s state media to lambast brands over perceived shortcomings — Nike (NKE), McDonald’s (MCD) and Apple (AAPL) have all been targeted by the show in prior years.This year, concerns about surveillance and privacy were front-and-center. Chinese state broadcaster China Central Television, or CCTV, used the program to accuse several companies of secretly collecting data about their customers using facial recognition — notably, without mentioning the massive network of facial recognition cameras that the Chinese government has built, capable of tracking people in real time.CCTV accused the Chinese unit of American manufacturer Kohler, for example, of installing cameras in hundreds of its stores in China and capturing the faces of customers to analyze their gender and age, among other details.”No matter which store the customers visit, or how many times they go, Kohler would know,” the Chinese state broadcaster reported during the program. It also singled out a BMW (BMWYY) dealership and a Max Mara retail store in the Shanghai area for using similar technology.Nationwide uproarWhile those brands weren’t the only ones criticized by the program — big foreign companies like Ford (F) and Nissan’s (NSANF) Infiniti brand were also accused of poor behavior, such as defects with car parts or other disputes — it’s the surveillance issue that appears to have gained the most traction.CCTV posts about the claims have generated tens of thousands of comments on the social media platform Weibo, where people worried about whether their personal information was being abused.”It’s not just Kohler,” wrote one Weibo user. “Did you forget even our residential buildings require facial recognition?”Kohler wrote on its official Weibo account on Tuesday that it had “already arranged” for its stores to remove the cameras “overnight,” and would power off any devices that it could not physically dismantle. The company denied, however, that it had stored or analyzed any data it collected with the cameras, adding that it only used them to count customer arrivals.Zhengtong Auto, a luxury car dealer that operates the BMW (BMWYY) store, said it had removed its cameras, too. And Chinese state media reported that Max Mara suspended the use of store cameras, though the company added that it was only using data to count customer traffic.Chinese authorities, meanwhile, have started investigating some of the companies featured on the program. Prosecutors announced Wednesday that they would open a probe into Ovopark, a Chinese company that supplied cameras to Kohler. Regulators in Guangzhou, Shenzhen, and Shanghai all said they would investigate companies accused of misusing facial recognition data, too.A ‘far cry’ from Beijing’s surveillance networkThe “315” show has broadcast in China for decades, often focusing on hot-button consumer rights issues of the moment.It’s well known for eliciting a quick response from the companies accused of bad behavior. Apple CEO Tim Cook even apologized in 2013 after the company’s warranty services were criticized on the show.This year’s focus on privacy and surveillance highlights rising worries in China about the use of such technology in the digital age, according to Willy Lam, a professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong who studies Chinese politics and societal issues.It’s not just Weibo users who have gotten wrapped up in the fallout, either.”The ‘315’ program is a reminder of how easily people’s facial IDs can be obtained” and “how rampant the use of the technology is,” wrote the editorial board of the Guangming Daily, a major state-owned national newspaper, on Wednesday. “Our regulation is lacking behind in the facial recognition industry.”But state-driven concerns about privacy and surveillance might ring a bit hollow to some.”Impinging on people’s privacy isn’t a good look for Kohler and BMW, but it’s a far cry [from] China’s massive [closed-circuit television] surveillance network,” said Paul Bischoff, a consumer privacy expert and the editor of Comparitech, a UK-based technology research firm.CCTV reported in 2017 that more than 20 million cameras had been installed across China at that time for the purpose of “maintaining public security.” And the total number through now may be much higher: China had 349 million surveillance cameras installed as of 2018, nearly five times the number of cameras in the United States, according to a report from IHS Markit Technology.Lam said that Beijing may think that stopping companies — and especially foreign ones — from obtaining large amounts of biometric information is a responsible decision.But the government still has a much farther reach than businesses to when it comes to surveillance. And Lam added that since discussions about such projects are restricted in mainland China, the public may not be aware of how far Beijing’s reach extends.”Yes, some tech companies do collect and store people’s photos to use in face recognition applications. And I support regulations restricting such data collection without consent,” said Bischoff. “US and European laws still lag behind in that regard. But unlike China, these applications are not being used to restrict freedom of movement or assembly.”Lam also suggested that the program — along with the fallout that has stemmed from it — points to another longstanding government priority: making sure that businesses know they aren’t above the government.”It’s a reminder that companies need to listen and play by the rules,” he added.